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Sambucus sieboldiana -

Family:Caprifoliaceae
Habit:Shrub
Height:4
Synonyms:
Range:E. Asia - China, Japan, Korea.
Sambucus sieboldiana () is a Shrub which grows to a height of 4m . It has a moderate growth rate. It has a hardness rating of 6.
Sambucus sieboldiana will flower in November. The flowers from this plant are hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and they are pollinated by Insects

Soil Information

Sambucus sieboldiana will grow in light (sandy),medium (loamy),hard (clay) soil. It is not necessary for the soil to be well drained.
The soil prefers the following PH / acid levels :
- pH of less than 6, Acidic soils
- pH between 6 and 8, Neutral soils
- pH greater than 8, Basic soils
Sambucus sieboldiana prefers moist soils

Ideal Planting Locations

Sambucus sieboldiana can grow in semi or areas with no shade.

Scrub and woods in the hills of W. Hupeh, 300 - 2400m[109].

Planting places suited to this plant described below.

Cultivation Details

Tolerates most soils, including chalk[200], but prefers a moist loamy soil[11, 200]. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Tolerates some shade but is best in a sunny position[1]. Tolerates atmospheric pollution and coastal situations[200]. This species is closely related to S. racemosa[11]. Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus[200].

Edible Uses*

* See disclaimer
Edible Rating: 1/5
Young leaves and buds - cooked and used as a vegetable[177, 183]. This use is inadvisable, see the notes above on toxicity. A tea is made from the leaves[177, 183].

Medicinal Uses*

* See disclaimer
Medicinal Rating: 0/5
None known

Propagation

Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in the autumn in a cold frame, when it should germinate in early spring. Stored seed can be sown in the spring in a cold frame but will probably germinate better if it is given 2 months warm followed by 2 months cold stratification first[78, 98, 113]. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle. If good growth is made, the young plants can be placed in their permanent positions during the early summer. Otherwise, either put them in a sheltered nursery bed, or keep them in their pots in a sheltered position and plant them out in spring of the following year. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 7 - 10cm with a heel, July/August in a frame[78]. Cuttings of mature wood of the current season's growth, 15 - 20cm with a heel, late autumn in a frame or a sheltered outdoor bed[78].

Known Hazards

Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, the leaves and stems of some, if not all, members of this genus are poisonous[9, 76]. The fruit of many species (although no records have been seen for this species) has been known to cause stomach upsets to some people. Any toxin the fruit might contain is liable to be of very low toxicity and is destroyed when the fruit is cooked[65, 76].

Other Uses

None known

Cultivars

no recorded cultivars

References

Trees and Shrubs Hardy in Great Britain. Vol 1 - 4 and Supplement.
Bean. W.
Author: Bean. W.
Rating:
Publisher : A classic with a wealth of information on the plants, but poor on pictures.
Date of Publication : 1981

Plantae Wilsonae.
Wilson. E. H.
Author: Wilson. E. H.
Rating:
Publisher : Details of the palnts collected by the plant collector E. H. Wilson on his travels in China. Gives some habitats. Not for the casual reader.
Date of Publication :

The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992.
Huxley. A.
Author: Huxley. A.
Rating:
Publisher : Excellent and very comprehensive, though it contains a number of silly mistakes. Readable yet also very detailed.
Date of Publication : 1992

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