aussie gardening


Home

Bookmark

Australian Garden Directory

Plant Search

Gardening Articles

Seed Exchange

Garden Clubs and Groups

Garden Decor

Garden Design Software

Garden Supplies and Nurseries

Gardening Blogs and Homepages

Gardening Tip and Ideas

Parks and Public Gardens




Pistacia terebinthus - Terebinth

Family:Pistaciaceae
Habit:Tree
Height:9
Width:6
Synonyms:
Range:Europe - Mediterranean.
Pistacia terebinthus (Terebinth) is a Tree which grows to a height of 9m and a width of 6m . It has a slow growth rate. It has a hardness rating of 9.
Terebinth will flower in November to January. the seeds ripen from April to May
The flowers from this plant are dioecious (each plant is either male or female, thus both genders need to be present to seed) and they are pollinated by

Soil Information

Terebinth will grow in light (sandy),medium (loamy), soil. It is / is important for the soil to be well drained.
The soil prefers the following PH / acid levels :
- pH of less than 6, Acidic soils
- pH between 6 and 8, Neutral soils
- pH greater than 8, Basic soils
Terebinth prefers either dry or moist soils

Ideal Planting Locations

Terebinth should not be planted in shady areas.

Dry open woods and scrub[45], usually in calcareous soils[50].

Planting places suited to this plant described below.

Cultivation Details

Requires a deep well-drained light soil[200], preferring a hot dry position in full sun[166]. It grows best in a sandy to stony alkaline soil[238]. This species is hardy in most of Britain but it is slow growing[1, 200]. This contradicts the report, also in [200], that this plant is only hardy to zone 9 and is therefore intolerant of anything other than the lightest frosts. Any pruning that needs to be done is best carried out in the spring[238]. Dioecious, male and female plants must be grown if seed is required.

Edible Uses*

* See disclaimer
Edible Rating: 2/5
Seed - raw or cooked[177]. Sweetish[183]. It is sweeter and oilier than an almond[2]. An edible oil is obtained from the seed[117, 183]. The immature fruits, including the stems, are preserved in vinegar and salt. Known as 'atsjaar', they are used as a relish to accompany wines served during meals[183]. The fruit is about 7mm long and 6 mm wide, it contains a single seed[200]. Young leaves - cooked and used as a vegetable[177, 183]. A resin from the trunk is used as a vegetable and as a chewing gum[177, 183].

Medicinal Uses*

* See disclaimer
Medicinal Rating: 2/5
The resin obtained from this tree (see below for more details) is antiseptic, antispasmodic, cytostatic, expectorant and vulnerary[100, 238]. It is taken internally in the treatment of chronic bronchial infections, streptococcal, urinary and renal infections, haemorrhage, gallstones, tapeworm and rheumatism[238]. Externally, it is used to treat arthritis, gout, sciatica, scabies and lice[238]. It has also been used in the treatment of cancer[100].

Propagation

Pre-soak the seed for 16 hours in alkalized water[78], or for 3 - 4 days in warm water[1], and sow late winter in a cold frame or greenhouse[78, 113]. Two months cold stratification may speed up germination, so it might be better to sow the seed in early winter[113]. The germination is variable and can be slow. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow on the plants for at least their first winter in a greenhouse. Plant out into their permanent positions in early summer and consider giving some protection from winter cold for their first year or two outdoors[K]. Cuttings of half-ripe wood from juvenile trees, July in a frame[113]. Layering.

Scented parts of the plants

Plant : Crushed

Known Hazards

None known

Other Uses

Yields the resin 'Cyprus turpentine', which is obtained from incisions made in the bark (not the trunk) of the tree[1, 2, 11, 46, 117, 200]. The incisions are made from mid summer to mid autumn[238]. It is mainly used medicinally in the treatment of cancer[100] and also as a chewing gum. The plant can be used as a rootstock for the pistachio nut, P. vera[11]. A red dye is obtained from galls that are formed on the leaves by aphis[100]. The plant is a source of tannin[46].

Cultivars

no recorded cultivars

References

Trees and Shrubs Hardy in Great Britain. Vol 1 - 4 and Supplement.
Bean. W.
Author: Bean. W.
Rating:
Publisher : A classic with a wealth of information on the plants, but poor on pictures.
Date of Publication : 1981

Flora Europaea
?
Author: ?
Rating:
Publisher : An immense work in 6 volumes (including the index). The standard reference flora for europe, it is very terse though and with very little extra information. Not for the casual reader.
Date of Publication : 1964

The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992.
Huxley. A.
Author: Huxley. A.
Rating:
Publisher : Excellent and very comprehensive, though it contains a number of silly mistakes. Readable yet also very detailed.
Date of Publication : 1992

DISCLAIMER: All information published on AussieGardening.com.au is for entertainment purposes only. Readers are encouraged to confirm the information contained here with other sources. The information is not intended to replace medical advice offered by doctors or dietary advice by dieticians. AussieGardening.com.au will not be liable for any direct, indirect, consequential, special, exemplary, or other damages arising therefrom.